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PANADOL REGULAR TABLETS

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PANAFLEX PAIN RELIEF PATCH

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PANADOL MENSTRUAL

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PANADOL CHILDREN’S BABY DROPS FOR INFANTS 1 MONTH – 2 YEARS

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PANADOL CHILDREN SUSPENSION (1-6 YEARS)

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CHILDREN’S PANADOL CHEWABLE TABLETS

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PANADOL CHILDREN SUSPENSION 6+

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Panadol Regular Tablets

MAL19950080XRZ

PANADOL OPTIZORB CAPLETS

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MAL09032037XR

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MAL06030845XRZ

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MAL 19930450XRZ

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Panadol Menstrual

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PANADOL MENSTRUAL

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MAL20033521XRZ

PANADOL ACTIFAST

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MAL12035013XR

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MAL20033521XRZ

PANADOL ACTIFAST COMPACT

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Panadol Children’s Baby Drops For Infants 1 Month – 2 Years

MAL19940228XRZ

PANADOL CHILDREN’S BABY DROPS FOR INFANTS 1 MONTH – 2 YEARS

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MAL05041840XRZ

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MAL19950682XRZ

CHILDREN’S PANADOL CHEWABLE TABLETS

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MAL05051051XRZ

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Baby Chewing Moms Sweater While She Holds Him
Baby Chewing Moms Sweater While She Holds Him

TEETHING - TAKING CARE OF YOUR BABY'S TEETH

Teething may begin in the first few months after birth, but most babies begin teething at about six months of age. In some babies, teething may begin later, even after 12 months of age.35-37 Dribbling at three months may be a result of teething,35 or due to your baby learning to put things in their mouth, which is part of normal development.

Pain management and what you can do to help

  • Rub your baby’s sore gums gently with a clean finger or soft toothbrush38
  • Give your baby a teething ring – either a soft rubber one, or the plastic type that can be kept in the refrigerator38 (note: liquid-filled plastic rings should be avoided36)
  • If you think your baby is in pain (for example crying, agitated or will not settle), consider giving paracetamol or ibuprofen as directed for the child’s age

What not to do

  • Do not tie a teething ring or other objects around your child’s neck36
  • Do not place anything frozen on your child’s gums36,38
  • Avoid hard sharp-edged toys that could damage teeth and gums38
  • Never cut the gums to help a tooth come through – this can lead to infection36
  • Do not use teething powders36
  • Never give your child aspirin, or place aspirin on the gums or teeth36
  • Do not use alcohol to rub on the baby’s gums36
  • Do not use homeopathic remedies as they may contain ingredients that are not safe for babies36

Signs of teething38

  • Rosy, flushed cheeks
  • Increased dribbling
  • Chewing on everything
  • Restlessness

References

35. National Health Service UK. Choices. Baby teething symptoms. Available at: http://www.nhs.uk/conditions/pregnancy-andbaby/ pages/teething-and-tooth-care.aspx. Accessed 3 October, 2016

36. US Medline Plus. Teething. Available at: https://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/002045.htm. Accessed 3 October, 2016.

37. Victoria State University. Better Health. Teeth development in children. Available at:
https://www.betterhealth.vic.gov.au/health/conditionsandtreatments/teeth-development-in-children. Accessed 3 October, 2016.

38. National Childbirth Trust. Teething baby: signs, symptoms and remedies. Available at:
https://www.nct.org.uk/parenting/teething#When%20do%20babies% 20start%20teething? Accessed 4 October, 2016.

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